TESOL President’s Blog: SETESOL Conference

One partnership that TESOL has with its 100+ affiliates is the Affiliate Speaker Program. This program encourages TESOL’s affiliate partners to select a TESOL board member to come and speak at their conference. As part of this program, I had the pleasure of visiting Argentina when I was on the board of directors. Luciana de Oliveira, our current president-elect, wrote a wonderful reflection on how powerful these experiences are for both the affiliate and the board member.

SETESOL LogoThis month, the Affiliate Speaker Program took me to the Southeast TESOL Conference in Birmingham, Alabama. SETESOL is a regional conference that represents member affiliates from Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North and South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia. The main conference was preceded by a PK–12 and Adult learners Day. The SETESOL conference opened on 5 October with a keynote by Stephen Krashen (other keynotes included Rebecca Oxford, Paulette Patterson Dilworth, Catherine Davies, Tery Medina, Ofelia García, and April Muchmore-Vokoun, and yours truly). More than 950 individuals attended the conference! Presentations and poster sessions provided a mix of practical how-to workshops and research-based presentations that considered implications for practice. Kudos to the organizers for putting together such a strong program!

The southeast of the United States provides a unique context for teaching English as an additional language. Some of the states are so-called New Destination states. Traditionally, these states have not received many immigrants but are now experiencing a significant and rapid influx of immigrants and immigrant families. As a result, these states have seen a tremendous increase in their English language learner populations and are trying to build up an infrastructure of qualified teachers and programs in a very short time. Needless to say, this is challenging for administrators and English language teachers alike.

I enjoyed many wonderful conversations with different K–12 teachers and higher education faculty during the conference. I was so impressed with the stories of resiliency and the passion of those who have chosen TESOL as their profession. Despite many challenges, these ELT professionals advocate for and work with PK through adult English language learners every day to ensure that they learn to navigate the complex and difficult realities of the world around us.

Ester

from TESOL Blog http://blog.tesol.org/tesol-presidents-blog-setesol-conference/

Advertisements

The Betty Azar Travel Grants: Gobinda Puri at TESOL 2017

Did you know Betty Azar generously supports TESOLers in their professional development annually? This year, we are very proud to have renamed the award the Betty Azar Travel Grant for Practicing ESL ESL/EFL Teachers because she deserves that recognition. This is the second year I’m coordinating the award and I can attest that volunteering on the TESOL Awards Council is an excellent way to connect with Betty, but also the award recipients all the committed volunteer reviewers. One special recipient of the award is Gobinda Puri, an educator from Nepal. Betty’s generous donation helps educators like Gobinda make a difference with his learners and community. Please read on as Gobinda shares his experience from the 2017 TESOL International Convention and Expo in Seattle.

Gobinda teaching in Nepal

Attending the 2017 TESOL International Convention & English Language Expo in Seattle was, for me, one of the most intense, unforgettable, once in a lifetime academic experiences, which has inspired me to become a more modern and creative educator of the 21st century. As one of the lucky recipients of the TESOL 2017 Professional Development Travel Grant, I had the opportunity to attend amazing exhibitor sessions, panel discussions, and practice-oriented presentations led by some of the most prominent language-teaching professionals from around the world.

Recipients of the 2017 Betty Azar Travel Grant for Practicing ESL/EFL Teachers

According to the official report, more than 6,000 educators from across the globe came to Seattle, Washington, USA, for the 2017 TESOL International Convention & English Language Expo. The largest of its kind in the world, the 51st annual convention began on Tuesday night with the opening keynote of Sherman Alexie and closed on Friday evening with a celebratory event. During those three-plus days, attendees could choose from nearly 1,000 educational sessions and visit more than 120 exhibitors in the English Language Expo.

I was a fortunate to attend and present at that grand gathering after a 36-hour journey. It was a long but fun journey travelling through Asia, Europe, and reaching the USA for the first time. I reached the venue a day before it began and had a short visit to the center to be familiar for the next day.

I reached the convention center at around 9:00 am (local time) on Tuesday, 22 March, and started connecting with people from different parts of the world whom I had met earlier in various occasions. There were some events scheduled for the day, like Educational Site visits, Doctoral Research Forum, Masters’ Student Forum, Affiliate Workshop, Reception for New members and first-time attendees, and most importantly the Sherman Alexie’s opening keynote.

I collected my bags and program book and roamed around the convention center. The convention center was magnificent, but it was difficult to find the particular halls and rooms. Each floor was like a maze, and there were seven floors. The Sheraton Hotel was adjacent to the convention center were some of the programs were conducted. I could see the attendees running up and down, greeting each other through the moving elevator.

I had volunteered to serve for two hours at Bags and Programs. I worked from 12:00 to 2:00, and I made many new friends and also got lunch voucher. From 3:30 pm to 5:00 pm, I attended the reception for the first-time attendees and new members. It was nice meeting and chatting with many newcomers from different corners of the world.

Finally, I rushed to the Ballroom to attend the keynote speech of Sherman Alexie. The hall was already full of people. I managed to find a seat and listened to him. The title of his keynote, “Power and Empowerment: An Urban Indian’s Comic, Poetic, and Highly Irreverent Look at World,” appeared on the screen and he energetically walked on to the stage. The audience roared and clapped, an event not to be missed. Alexie is known for his semi-autobiographical writings that illuminate challenges facing American Indians while promoting cultural expression and social change. During his keynote, he presented his take on language, identity, struggle, perseverance, hope, and respect–all with a heavy dose of candor and wit. He also signed copies of his book “The Diary of a Part-time Indian.”

The next day I hurried to catch Dudley Reynolds’ presidential keynote titled “Professional English Language Teachers in a 2.0 World.” He made a wonderful presentation and asked what professional English language teachers offer this world. He said that the 2.0 world prizes nontraditional learning, interdisciplinary, and technology. He also highlighted that educational systems everywhere want to educate more students to higher standards while cutting resources for teacher education and development.

Following the keynote, I attended a panel discussion titled “Engaging With Diverse Contexts: Enriching Practices in Teacher Education Programs.” The presenters discussed innovative collaborations in their programs that empower teachers through experience in context-sensitive and location-specific pedagogies. Another important panel discussion I attended was “A Memorial Panel on the Life and Legacy of Braj Kachru.”

On the second day, I presented a poster session titled “Addressing Diversity in the EFL Classroom: Reflection of Nepalese Community School.” More than 60 people visited the session, and I had a wonderful discussion among the participants.

Exchanging with TESOLers in Seattle, Washington

The third day began with the James E. Alatis Plenary by Guadalupe Valdes titled “Rumination of an Old Language Teacher.” In this presentation, Vades talked about SLA theory and research from the perspective of a dedicated language teacher. She shared some of what she had learned during her career and involved the participants with the topics. Following the plenary, I enjoyed the session and informal professional talks.

My teaching portfolio became more diversified due to cutting-edge methodologies and techniques that I am anxious to take back with me to Nepal, where I have been teaching and supporting teachers for last 13 years. Some of my favorite sessions included tips on using video feedback to comment on student presentations, and enriching, engaging, and empowering using YouTube videos. I learned how to use phone cameras as interactive and fun language learning devices and how to help learners improve their speaking and presentation skills by applying practical strategies that TED speakers use. I experimented with various online applications that were designed for differentiated instruction within YouTube videos and found out about cooperative learning 2.0 tools which can help us create “we-ness” in our classroom.

The best moments included attending the presentation on using digital tasks and mobile devices for pair and group activities. Last, but certainly not the least, Young Zhao’s morning keynote on perils and promises of education in the age of smart machines was a brilliant, hilarious, and amazing moment that marked the end of a truly inspirational conference.

Now I am elated to have received a Azar Travel grant to attend the 51st TESOL Convention as a first-time attendee. I learned so many beautiful ideas in the convention and brought them back to my classroom and colleagues in the region. Moreover, I met many teaching professionals in person and enjoyed social networking with colleagues from throughout the world. Even more, I have become a resource person in my local organization to encourage new teachers to attend the conferences and groom professionally. I would like to thank Betty Azar, Sherry Blok, and the TESOL Awards Professional Council  for this wonderful opportunity.
Gobinda Puri
Itahari, Nepal

Interested in applying for the Betty Azar Travel Grant? Find out more by visiting the TESOL website. The deadline is 1 November 2017.

from TESOL Blog http://blog.tesol.org/the-betty-azar-travel-grants-gobinda-puri-at-tesol-2017/

💕Friday freebie!💕

 Hello everyone,
Hello everyone!
Here is this weeks freebie!
The 3 Sounds of "ed" Past Tense freebie Verb Game  This fun and effective freebie grammar game, The 3 sounds of "ed" Past Tense Verbs games and grammar activities are engaging and enjoyable ways for children to practice using The 3 Sounds of "ed" Past Tense Verbs.  This free game packet contains some of the great games/activities found in our original game packet.  This package consists of : *GAME BOARD *GAME CARDS *WORD CARDS *NUMBER CARDS  These grammar based games with lesson plans and activities give students the opportunity to practice English vocabulary and language skills in a fun and relaxing setting. As students play these engaging games they naturally transfer skills they learn in class!  Please follow us!

This fun and effective freebie grammar game, The 3 sounds of “ed” Past Tense Verbs games and grammar activities are engaging and enjoyable ways for children to practice using The 3 Sounds of “ed” Past Tense Verbs.

This free game packet contains some of the great games/activities found in our original game packet.

This package consists of :
*GAME BOARD
*GAME CARDS
*WORD CARDS
*NUMBER CARDS

These grammar based games with lesson plans and activities give students the opportunity to practice English vocabulary and language skills in a fun and relaxing setting. As students play these engaging games they naturally transfer skills they learn in class!

Click here to get your freebie!  Please follow us and rate this product!

Happy teaching💕!

from Fun To Teach ESL – Teaching English as a Second Language http://esleld.blogspot.com/2017/10/friday-freebie.html

Using songs and chants in the ELD classroom💥

SONGS AND/OR CHANTS 

Songs and Chants are a dynamic part of an ELD lesson. Songs/ Chants set the stage for the lesson and help focus the learner on the vocabulary and grammatical structure you are teaching.


GROUPING: Whole class
OBJECTIVE: To introduce a song/chant
WHAT YOU NEED:
• Student copies of the song/chant
• The song/chant written on chart paper

HOW TO PLAY:
• Sing or chant the song the first time to your students
• Focus in on pronunciation
• Anchor your student’s attention by teaching your students to “look at my mouth.” Help them make the correct mouth and facial movements as you help them pronounce words correctly
• Hand out mirrors and see if your students can make their mouth “look like yours” when pronouncing new words or difficult sounds


VARIATION: Gesture as you sing Sing one part more than once


ESL & ELD Songs and Chants Volume I SING IT LOUD! SING IT CLEAR!  This 51-page collection of ELD and ESL songs and black lines are perfect for every classroom with second language learners. Open every lesson with a song or chant from this rich collection of ELD based lyrics and watch your students' fluency grow. Volume I includes 22 songs/ chants, lesson ideas and activities that will raise the oral academic language of your students to new heights. The songs and chants are sung to familiar popular songs or the lyrics are used in call backs or chant style tunes. These lyrics provide a compelling way to begin your ELD lesson while targeting complex English Structures. You and your students will enjoy these engaging and memorable lyrics.  Songs and Chants for: Possessive Pronouns Reflexive Pronouns Present Tense Questions Regular Past Tense Verbs Past Tense Questions Present Perfect Prepositions  Language levels included: Beginning Intermediate Advanced

This 51-page collection of ELD and ESL songs and black lines are perfect for every classroom with second language learners. Open every lesson with a song or chant from this rich collection of ELD based lyrics and watch your students’ fluency grow. Volume I includes 22 songs/ chants, lesson ideas and activities that will raise the oral academic language of your students to new heights. The songs and chants are sung to familiar popular songs or the lyrics are used in call backs or chant style tunes. These lyrics provide a compelling way to begin your ELD lesson while targeting complex English Structures. You and your students will enjoy these engaging and memorable lyrics.

Songs and Chants for:
Possessive Pronouns
Reflexive Pronouns
Present Tense Questions
Regular Past Tense Verbs
Past Tense Questions
Present Perfect
Prepositions

Language levels included:💥
Beginning
Intermediate
Advanced






from Fun To Teach ESL – Teaching English as a Second Language http://esleld.blogspot.com/2017/10/using-songs-and-chants-in-eld-classroom.html

New Book – Challenging Leadership Stereotypes Through Discourse

Hello, ESPers worldwide!

Have you considered how the ESP Project Leader Profiles (36 published to date with projects on six continents) might be viewed as research data that can give us a deeper understanding of leadership itself? Please keep this question in mind as I share with you in this TESOL Blog post a new book that explores leadership using discourse analytical approaches.

“Challenging Leadership Stereotypes Through Discourse: Power, Management and Gender” (edited by Cornelia Ilie and Stephanie Schnurr) is described by the editors as follows:

The various case studies in this volume move beyond questions of who is a leader and what leaders do, to how leadership is practiced in various communities of practice and how leadership makes change possible. The different cross-cultural and interdisciplinary approaches used across the chapters provide deeper insights into the competing, multi-voiced, controversial and complex identities and relationships enacted in leadership discourse practices. They thereby provide an enhanced understanding of how leadership is discursively constructed, deconstructed, and reconstructed in a variety of formal and informal leadership activities from organising and motivating to managing change and making decisions. (p. 2)

As I read their description of leadership as a social construction, I began to think of how the ESP Project Leader Profiles published in the TESOL Blog provide readers with insights into how leadership is conceptualized in the world of ESP practitioners and researchers.

In comments about Ilie and Schnurr’s volume, Gail Fairhurst, who is known worldwide for her discursive leadership theory (see Fairhurst, 2007), writes,

For those who feel passionately that a psychological lens is not the only way to view leadership – and that an equally viable lens positions leadership as relationally constructed in communication and through discourse, this is the book for you. Cornelia Ilie and Stephanie Schnurr have edited an exciting volume of papers that grounds leadership in issues of power, context, meaning, and interaction process. Incisive analysis of leadership and other stereotypes are a focus in this book, but certainly not the only gems that readers will soon discover. (Gail Fairhurst, Distinguished University Research Professor, University of Cincinnati, USA)

I was pleased to read Fairhurst’s comments for two reasons. First, I have been looking at leadership discourse as a linguist and argue that there is much to learn about leadership with such a lens. Second, I have used Fairhurst’s (2011) book, “The Power of Framing: Creating the Language of Leadership,” with undergraduate students in my leadership seminars and highly recommend it.

If you have been reading publications about leadership and discourse, I assume that many of the authors in Ilie and Schnurr’s volume will be familiar to you:

  • Janet Holmes
  • Jonathan Clifton
  • Cornelia Ilie
  • Stephanie Schnurr, Angela Chan, Joella Loew, and Olga Zayts
  • Kevin Knight
  • Nick Wilson
  • Judith Baxter
  • Diana Boxer, Lennie M. Jones and Florenscia Cortes-Conde
  • Catherine Nickerson and Valerie Priscilla Goby
  • Momoko Nakamura

Though I do have a chapter in this volume, I am happy to promote the book because it really is a valuable collection of chapters for scholars of discourse and leadership. I mentioned the first author, Janet Holmes, and the Language in the Workplace Project in New Zealand in the ESP Project Leader Profile of Susan Barone.

So let me ask you to consider the following questions:

  • When you read the definitions of leadership and the narratives about leadership action and communication provided by the ESP project leaders in the profiles, what are the stereotypes of leadership that you see?
  • How is leadership being conceptualized in the profiles?
  • Why are these important questions? What can an investigation of the ESP Project Leader Profiles teach us about leadership?

Ilie and Schnurr’s volume can be a helpful resource in addressing these questions because the volume gives us the opportunity to learn about leadership, stereotypes, and discourse analysis.

The ESP Project Leader Profiles, which continue to be published on the TESOL Blog, can be accessed in the ESPIS Library and also in the About This Community section of ESP News (the newsletter of the ESPIS). For easy reference, I have also listed the links to them here in this post. Please enjoy, analyze, and learn!

The ESP Project Leader Profiles

  1. May 5, 2015: ESP Project Leader Profile: Kristin Ekkens
  2. June 2, 2015: ESP Project Leader Profile: Charles Hall
  3. July 14, 2015: ESP Project Leader Profile: Ronna Timpa
  4. August 11, 2015: ESP Project Leader Profile: Evan Frendo
  5. September 8, 2015: ESP Project Leader Profile: Jaclyn Gishbaugher
  6. October 6, 2015: ESP Project Leader Profile: Anne Lomperis
  7. October 20, 2015: ESP Project Leader Profile: Ethel Swartley
  8. November 3, 2015: ESP Project Leader Profile: David Kertzner
  9. December 1, 2015: ESP Project Leader Profile: Margaret van Naerssen
  10. December 15, 2015: ESP Project Leader Profile: Marvin Hoffland
  11. January 12, 2016: ESP Project Leader Profile: John Butcher
  12. January 26, 2016: ESP Project Leader Profile: Karen Schwelle
  13. February 23, 2016: ESP Project Leader Profile: Esther Perez Apple
  14. March 8, 2016: ESP Project Leader Profile: Kevin Knight
  15. April 5, 2016: ESP Project Leader Profile: Shahid Abrar-ul-Hassan
  16. May 3, 2016: ESP Project Leader Profile: Robert Connor
  17. May 17, 2016: ESP Project Leader Profile: Jigang Cai
  18. June 14, 2016: ESP Project Leader Profile: Ismaeil Fazel
  19. June 28, 2016: ESP Project Leader Profile: Yilin Sun
  20. July 26, 2016: ESP Project Leader Profile: Tarana Patel
  21. August 23, 2016: ESP Project Leader Profile: Prithvi Shrestha
  22. September 6, 2016: ESP Project Leader Profile: Robin Sulkosky
  23. October 18, 2016: ESP Project Leader Profile: Philip Chappell
  24. November 2, 2016: ESP Project Leader Profile: Jie Shi
  25. December 13, 2016: The 25th ESP Project Leader Profile: Laurence Anthony
  26. January 24, 2017: ESP Project Leader Profile: Barrie Roberts
  27. February 7, 2017: ESP Project Leader Profile: Jen Cope
  28. February 21, 2017: ESP Project Leader Profile: Susan Barone
  29. March 21, 2017: ESP Project Leader Profile: Debra Lee
  30. April 18, 2017: ESP Project Leader Profile: Kay Westerfield
  31. May 2, 2017: ESP Project Leader Profile: Stephen Horowitz
  32. June 14, 2017: ESP Project Leader Profile: Pam Dzunu
  33. July 11, 2017: ESP Project Leader Profile: Marta Baffy
  34. August 8, 2017: ESP Project Leader Profile: Vince Ricci
  35. September 6, 2017: ESP Project Leader Profile: Kirsten Schaetzel
  36. October 5, 2017: ESP Project Leader Profile: Elizabeth Matthews

Finally, if you are interested in developing your leadership skills, TESOL International Association provides the following opportunities:

The Leadership Development Certificate Program is for TESOL members only (and free!) and offers you the opportunity to hear the success stories of TESOL International Association leaders. (We encourage ESPIS leaders to register for the self-study program because you can learn how to be a leader in TESOL International Association.) The ELT Leadership Management Certificate Program gives you the opportunity to discuss leadership with other participants worldwide. The stories of leadership that are shared by the participants reflect their professional situations. Personally, I have been able to learn about “leadership” in both programs.

Good luck learning about leadership and growing as a leader!

All the best,
Kevin

References

Ilie, C., & Schnurr, S. (Eds.). (2017). Challenging leadership stereotypes through discourse: Power, management and gender. Singapore: Springer.

Fairhurst, G. (2007). Discursive leadership: In conversation with leadership psychology. London: Sage.

Fairhurst, G. (2011). The power of framing: Creating the language of leadership. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

from TESOL Blog http://blog.tesol.org/new-book-challenging-leadership-stereotypes-through-discourse/