👀TPT Back to School!👀

 💜Hello everyone!

August is back to school month!

It is time to get inspired and Teachers Pay Teachers is the place to find your inspiration!


https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/ESL-ELD-Songs-and-Chants-Volume-I-224849
August 1st and 2nd is the site -wide sale.  

Pop over to the Fun To Teach Store and stock up on products that will inspire you and ignite your teaching!

Check out some of our best selling products!

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Fun-To-Teach







 

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Fun-To-Teach 

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Fun-To-Teach 

Happy summer!

Happy Teaching! 

Lori



from Fun To Teach ESL – Teaching English as a Second Language http://esleld.blogspot.com/2017/07/tpt-back-to-school.html

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🔨September Workshop🔨

ELD Make and Take Workshops
By Fun To Teach 

🔨ELD Toolbox Booster🔨 
Fun effective strategies and activities to fill your ELD toolbox!

Save your seat now! Fax in the registration today 
2017 – Our New Workshop!
September 29, 2017
Portland, OR 

Are you interested in adding another layer of practical knowledge to your ELD instruction? Then this workshop is for you. Join us for the ELD Toolbox Booster workshop and enhance English Language instruction with procedures, routines, strategies and activities that will develop oral language, vocabulary and fluency in English learners. Come fill your ELD toolbox with language games, activities, strategies picture cards, songs, chants, sentence frames, and “make & take” activities that you can use in your classroom the next day! 

Who should attend?
ELD and ESL teachers, K-5 classroom teachers, specialist teachers and everyone who wants to fill their ELD toolkit!

🔨ELD Toolbox Booster 🔨

Portland, Oregon
Fun effective strategies and activities to fill your ELD toolbox!


$200.00PER WORKSHOP

 Call for more info or visit our website!
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fax or mail a Purchase Order or check

Happy Teaching!

Lori
from Fun To Teach ESL – Teaching English as a Second Language http://esleld.blogspot.com/2017/07/september-workshop.html

ESP Training for Student Consulting Purposes

Hello, ESPers worldwide!

I was reflecting on my ELT program development recently, and I recognized that my leadership development programs are often connected to consulting. For such consulting activities, there may be a need for ESP training. In this TESOL Blog post, I would like to focus on a few programs that are listed on my website – The Leadership Connection Project.

The Introduction to the website states:

The Leadership Connection Project website was created for the purpose of recording the various leadership development activities that I have conducted with my students in the Career Education Center and in the Department of International Communication (International Business Career major) at Kanda University of International Studies (KUIS) in Chiba, Japan.

In our profession, it is important to share accomplishments with stakeholders, so on the website I have identified the departments of my university together with the relevant programs:
KUIS Career Education Center

KUIS Intercultural Communication Department (International Business Career Major)

KUIS Self-Access Learning Center

KUIS International Affairs Division

I consider the six programs above  to be related to the development of leaders because I conceptualize leadership as involving communication to create and to achieve visions. In each of the six programs, the students communicate to create visions and to achieve those visions.

Four of the six programs include consulting activities:

  • Kevin’s Company
  • Leadership seminars
  • Global Leadership Competition in the SALC
  • Inaugural Global Challenge Program

As consultants, the students work in teams (or alone) to create visions for organizations (i.e., the clients) through the following activities:

  • interacting (through email and/or face to face) with leaders of the organizations
  • conducting research about the organizations online and onsite
  • analyzing the internal and external environments to identify strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats, etc.
  • delivering recommendations (to the leaders of the organizations) in PowerPoint presentations

When the students deliver their recommendations in PowerPoint presentations, they are creating visions.

The ESP strands of each program are connected with the students’ needs for English as a communication tool in their roles as consultants. For example, the instructor may need to help the students to do the following in English:

  • conduct research online and/or onsite (and accordingly participate in interviews, meetings, discussions, etc.)
  • write email to various stakeholders (including leaders of the organizations as well as mentors/coaches)
  • create and deliver presentations

The students’ needs to use English as a communication tool are immediate needs.

In connection with such immediate needs for communication in English, the students may need to learn specific content. The content is related to the consulting project. Consider the following examples:

  • In Kevin’s Company, the students recommend how to improve the business operations of British Hills, a resort and educational training facility in Japan.
  • In the leadership seminars and in the Global Leadership Competition in the SALC, the students provide consulting services for the KUIS SALC.
  • In the Global Challenge Program, the students needed to understand the food industry in Japan and the business operations of the retail outlets of a food company.

The teacher may not be an expert in such content but may be able to teach the students how to find what they need on their own (i.e., self-access learning). In addition, in some cases, the students may have content available in Japanese and need to learn how to communicate the Japanese content in the English language.

In summary, in the four programs that include consulting activities, the instructor is a leader of consulting teams. The members of these teams are themselves acting as leaders when they provide their recommendations (i.e., visions) to their respective clients. The need for ESP training depends on the immediate needs of the students for English communication skills in their roles as consultants.

Good luck with your ESP and leadership development activities!

All the best,
Kevin

from TESOL Blog http://blog.tesol.org/esp-training-for-student-consulting-purposes/

A bit closer!

Happy Thursday!
Here is a fun song to practice early advanced prepositions!  Sing it to the tune of Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star or as a call back.

Have fun with it!

A bit closer
A bit farther
A bit higher
A bit lower
A little to the left
A little to the right
Not quite in the middle
Within an inch…or a ????

 Happy teaching!

ESL & ELD Songs and Chants Volume I SING IT LOUD! SING IT CLEAR!  This 51-page collection of ELD and ESL songs and black lines are perfect for every classroom with second language learners. Open every lesson with a song or chant from this rich collection of ELD based lyrics and watch your students' fluency grow. Volume I includes 22 songs/ chants, lesson ideas and activities that will raise the oral academic language of your students to new heights. The songs and chants are sung to familiar popular songs or the lyrics are used in call backs or chant style tunes. These lyrics provide a compelling way to begin your ELD lesson while targeting complex English Structures. You and your students will enjoy these engaging and memorable lyrics.  Songs and Chants for: Possessive Pronouns Reflexive Pronouns Present Tense Questions Regular Past Tense Verbs Past Tense Questions Present Perfect Prepositions  Language levels included: Beginning Intermediate Advanced

This 51-page collection of ELD and ESL songs and black lines are perfect for every classroom with second language learners. Open every lesson with a song or chant from this rich collection of ELD based lyrics and watch your students’ fluency grow. Volume I includes 22 songs/ chants, lesson ideas and activities that will raise the oral academic language of your students to new heights. The songs and chants are sung to familiar popular songs or the lyrics are used in call backs or chant style tunes. These lyrics provide a compelling way to begin your ELD lesson while targeting complex English Structures. You and your students will enjoy these engaging and memorable lyrics.

Songs and Chants for:
Possessive Pronouns
Reflexive Pronouns
Present Tense Questions
Regular Past Tense Verbs
Past Tense Questions
Present Perfect
Prepositions

Language levels included:
Beginning
Intermediate
Advanced




from Fun To Teach ESL – Teaching English as a Second Language http://esleld.blogspot.com/2017/07/a-bit-closer.html

💕Friday freebie!💕

Teacher See Teacher Do

Hello everyone,


April over at Teacher Say Teacher Do has a great freebie to download and I wanted to share it with you!


She made a colorful visual one page reminder for teachers of the most effective strategies to use when working with second language learners.


Click here to go to her Teachers Pay Teachers store  and download your free copy today!


Happy teaching! 💕

Lori
from Fun To Teach ESL – Teaching English as a Second Language http://esleld.blogspot.com/2017/07/friday-freebie.html

🎈50 Back to School Sentence Starters🎈

Hello Teachers!
https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/50-Back-to-School-Sentence-Starters-575716Wow! July is speeding by!

Are you thinking about school yet?  I am!

This is a great product to get you started! 

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/50-Back-to-School-Sentence-Starters-575716Sentence starters provide a low-stress way for young writers to practice writing complete sentences. Our sentence starters are open-ended requiring your students to use higher order thinking skills while practicing their writing.  Provide your students the opportunities to write creatively with 50 Back to School Sentence Starters.

This great ELA unit has 50 great back to school sentence starters to get your students writing. You can learn about your students as they complete these open ended writing pieces. Let your students pick the sentence starter that will get them engaged in writing or choose one for the whole class.

Each sentence starter is printed on an individual card and on lined paper.

Simply copy, cut, and write!

We have included black lines for the following:
sentence starter word wall cards
individual lined papers for each sentence starter.

In addition, our activities and ideas provide fun and interest so your students learn through hands-on experiences. No more searching for writing prompts or sentence starters. This unit is ready to go to work for you!
https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/50-Back-to-School-Sentence-Starters-575716

Click here to purchase at our Fun To Teach store at TPT!

Have fun and Happy Teaching!
💕

from Fun To Teach ESL – Teaching English as a Second Language http://esleld.blogspot.com/2017/07/50-back-to-school-sentence-starters.html

ESP Project Leader Profile: Marta Baffy

Hello, ESPers worldwide!

In this ESP Project Leader Profile, we meet Marta Baffy, a lawyer and a linguist at Georgetown Law in the United States. (I love how ESP researchers and practitioners often have expertise in multiple areas.)

Marta’s profile appears below:

Marta Baffy is a lawyer and linguist with over a decade of ESL teaching experience in Hungary and the United States. She obtained a J.D. from the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law and an M.A. in applied linguistics from Teachers College, Columbia University, and a Ph.D. in linguistics from Georgetown University. Marta is the faculty director of the Two-Year Master of Laws (LL.M.) Program at Georgetown Law, where she teaches academic legal English (ALE), a year-long intensive course in the first year of the program that prepares international students for the linguistic and intellectual demands of LL.M. study in the second year of the Program. Marta’s research interests lie at the intersection of law and linguistics, particularly in the courtroom and legal classroom. Her most recent work focuses on how foreign-trained attorneys are socialized into the culture of an American law school during class interactions. Marta lives in Baltimore with her husband and dog.

 In Marta’s responses to the following interview questions, we learn about how she created a “legal analysis unit” for academic legal English (ALE). (After her responses, you can see a photo of her dog!)

Marta Baffy
Director of the Two-Year LL.M. Program
Senior Lecturer in Legal English
Georgetown Law

(1) Define leadership in your own words.

Leadership to me means collaborating with others and asking for feedback and help from students and colleagues throughout the life of a project. Leadership also means recognizing the unique strengths and expertise of colleagues and harnessing these to make the project a success. Finally, leadership means a willingness to engage in critical self-reflection.

(2) Tell me an ESP project success story. Focus on your communication as a leader in the project. How did you communicate with stakeholders to make that project successful?

Project: Create a legal analysis unit for the ALE class.

Background: When I began teaching in an earlier iteration of the ALE class several years ago, I recognized that students weren’t reading legal cases or working on exam-taking and legal analysis skills in the class. Legal cases typically form the foundation of students’ LL.M. coursework and practically all LL.M. students take timed exams during their studies. Indeed, many students take only exam classes, with grades for these courses based entirely on a single exam administered at the end of the semester. I noticed a gap that needed to be filled.

So a large-scale, long-term project I took on was to create a robust legal analysis unit for the ALE class. Broadly speaking, this has involved gradually incorporating legal cases and multiple timed-writing tasks into the ALE syllabus. Students now read ten torts/negligence cases in the fall semester, which we discuss using the Socratic Method. They “brief” (summarize) each case, for which they receive feedback on content and language. Finally, they complete four timed-writing tasks in which they must identify and resolve legal issues using rules from the cases we’ve read. Students receive individualized feedback on both content and language on each of the timed writing tasks (two 30-minute questions, a one-hour practice exam, and a two-hour final exam). In the spring semester we repeat roughly the same process, with eight cases in the area of criminal procedure/police interrogation law.

To carry out this project, I first had to collaborate with my co-instructors. We employ a team-teaching approach at Georgetown Law: I am a content/language specialist, while my co-instructors are language specialists. Together, we’ve negotiated how much class and out-of-class time we can dedicate to class discussions of the cases and feedback on students’ case briefs and timed writing tasks, as well as who would do what. Though ALE meets for eight hours per week, we have to cover a range of other topics in the class, including paper writing and general writing skills, grammar and style, seminar discussion, and pronunciation.

At first, I was convinced that I could (and should) do the all of the legal analysis unit myself: the planning, teaching, and feedback on both content and language. But with time I learned—through self-reflection and some eye-opening conversations with my co-instructors—that part of being a successful leader is collaborating with others and creating opportunities for colleagues to use their expertise. I’ve learned to ask for help from my colleagues and at times defer to their professional judgment instead of taking everything on myself. So while I read timed-writing tasks for content, they often help me by providing the language feedback. This has decreased feelings of burnout and ensured that our students get better, more useful comments.

To make the legal analysis unit a success, I also communicated extensively with students. We’ve made tweaks to the ALE syllabus every year based on student feedback. We obtain this feedback in the form of anonymous course evaluations (administered twice during the first year of the program) and exit interviews (conducted at the end of the second year of the program). Communicating with students in these ways has been critical for continually refining the ALE syllabus and making sure that we create optimal conditions for students’ linguistic and intellectual development. Recent evaluations indicate that students have learned a great deal from, and even enjoyed, the legal analysis component of the class. Further, students’ grades in their elective law classes suggest that the increased focus on legal cases and timed writing tasks has helped them to do better in their law classes.

Communication with and openness to the ideas of both my colleagues and students has been essential to making the legal analysis unit useful and effective. Having learned this valuable lesson, I now try to use it to inform my approach to other teaching/curricular projects.


Marta’s dog, Stanley

When I read Marta’s responses, the following jumped out at me: “Part of being a successful leader is collaborating with others and creating opportunities for colleagues to use their expertise.” I would like to change the word colleagues to stakeholders because of Marta’s extensive communication with students. In a previous blog post, I wrote that “we could say that the creation of the vision (i.e., the training) and how to achieve the vision (i.e., the delivery of the training) continue to be co-constructed (i.e., negotiated) by the various stakeholders over time.” It seems to me that Marta has created opportunities for stakeholders to continually develop the ALE program.

Please feel free to contact Marta directly with any questions about her leadership, program development, and/or her dog, Stanley.

All the best,

Kevin

from TESOL Blog http://blog.tesol.org/esp-project-leader-profile-marta-baffy/