ESP Project Leader Profile: Vince Ricci

Hello, ESPers worldwide!

In this ESP project leader profile, we meet Vince Ricci, who wears many hats. He is both an ESP practitioner and a graduate school/MBA admissions counselor when he works with his Japanese clients to prepare them for the top universities in the United States, Europe, and Japan.

Vince’s bio describes him as follows:

Vince Ricci has been a full-time graduate admissions consultant since 2002. After launching VincePrep.com in 2007, Vince returned to AGOS as a Director in 2014. Vince has been recognized with the Lyons Award for Service to Stanford University, a Distinguished Teaching Award for the State of Louisiana, and Non-Profit Program of the Year for the City of New Orleans. Before moving to Tokyo in 2002, Vince completed his M.A. in Digital Media Design for Learning at NYU. He currently serves as President of The Association of International Graduate Admissions Consultants (AIGAC).

As an undergraduate student at Stanford University, Vince was a leader of an improvisational (improv) theater group. Such improv theater is fascinating to me because of its focus on communication and relevance to leadership development. Vince talks about leadership in his interview responses.


Vince Ricci
Founder and CEO, VincePrep, and Director, AGOS

(1) Define leadership in your own words.

Leaders identify and capture opportunities—for themselves and others. As a leader, I provide tools that help my colleagues and clients get where they’re trying to go.

(2) Tell me an ESP project success story. Focus on your communication as a leader in the project. How did you communicate with stakeholders to make that project successful?

Since 2002, I have been preparing Japanese and other nonnative English speakers for Harvard Business School (HBS) interviews. Over the years, I have noticed that many applicants struggle with the unpredictable and conversational nature of the HBS interview.

What is the HBS interview like, and what are they evaluating? As explained on the HBS Admissions Director’s blog (retrieved 2013/10):

Your interviewer will be a member of the Admissions Board and will be very experienced in meeting with candidates. He/she will have read your application thoroughly. There is no formula for how an interview will be conducted or list of standard questions. Your written application will be a starting point but the conversation may not stay there very long. Your interviewer is trying to understand you and assess your ability to thrive in our case method classroom.

First, an applicant must understand how the case method classroom works. Professors “cold call” students, and then challenge their answers. Students are also encouraged to challenge each other. Meanwhile, a scribe sits in the corner marking each time a student speaks. Class participation counts for 50% of a student’s grade. Not everyone who starts an HBS MBA can finish. Every year, students are asked to not return for the second year.

Second, an applicant must understand how her interviewer thinks. The HBS interviewer has read the applicant’s entire 30-page application. Sometimes the interviewer wants the applicant to dig deeper into something that he has already shared. Other times, she asks applicants to surprise her by sharing information not included in the written application. The HBS application contains lots of personal and professional information, so it’s pretty hard to surprise the interviewer.

Until 2008, I only provided one-to-one mock interviews. In these mock interviews, I play the role of a proxy interviewer.  MBA alumni interviewers ask a relatively consistent list of predictable questions, with minimal follow-up. By contrast, HBS interviewers ask whatever they want, in any order they want. A domestic Japanese client with limited English who had written about eating raw horse meat while on assignment in Kazakhstan was asked, “How was the horse?” as soon as he took his seat.  A returnee client was asked for 10 minutes about a decision he had made at age 13.

After 15 years of seeing who gets admitted and who gets denied, and what they report after their interview, I see a clear pattern: Those who prepare more usually do better. I wondered: How could I motivate clients to dedicate more time to interview prep? Then it hit me: Let them meet their competition. Thus, in 2008, I began offering Japan’s first HBS Interview Seminar because I wanted to help Japan-based MBA applicants who have been invited to interview with HBS practice as a group.

From 2008 through 2015, I continued to modify the three-hour seminar. I asked everyone to answer a few common questions, including “Tell me about yourself” and “Why MBA?” I provide feedback, and ask everyone to critique each other, offering one point of praise and one improvement point. Clients left the seminar feeling confident and glad to know their peers who might be joining them at HBS. Still, after the real interview, I consistently heard from clients that they struggled with surprise questions. I knew each interview is truly unscripted. Still, even if I could not help clients guess what interviewers might ask, maybe I could prepare them to select and prepare stories that they wanted to share.

In October 2016, I asked my clients if they were interested in learning a new method that I was still testing. I called it 16 Stories. I told my clients:

Once we know which stories demonstrate our core values and potential contributions to the school and the learning environment, then we can look for opportunities to share those stories—to tell the right story at the right time. Starting today, and continuing on your own, with each other, and with me begin to gather a mix of stories from your professional and personal life. These stories should demonstrate your ability to drive results, bridge diverse teams, motivate peers and junior colleagues, and influence senior colleagues and decision-makers. Be sure to include both successful examples as well as times when you failed or felt like you failed, to achieve results. Most importantly, think about what you learned about yourself in the process.

The seminar I delivered in October 2016 was my best ever because I fostered a community of practice that continued to thrive after the seminar ended. After the seminar, my clients met and tested the 16 Stories method on their own and gave me hints about how to improve it.

Of those in attendance, two were admitted to HBS and two to Stanford GSB. My 16 Stories method works particularly well for Stanford interviews, which are usually conducted by alumni who share the applicant’s industry background and usually consistent primarily, if not entirely, of behavioral questions. Preparing a broad range of stories, and understanding what those stories might indicate about one’s future behavior, is the best way to prepare for a behavioral interview.

If you wish to learn more about 16 Stories, please visit my YouTube channel.


I read Vince’s description of his interview training program with much interest! In government-sponsored Hello Work programs in Japan for unemployed Japanese professionals preparing to re-enter the workforce, I also have my students prepare each other for their future interviews in English. They are usually not future competitors, and they often have different language abilities. Through such training, they learn how to frame themselves for successful interviews.

Do you have questions or comments for Vince? Please feel free to contact him directly!

All the best,

Kevin

from TESOL Blog http://blog.tesol.org/esp-project-leader-profile-vince-ricci/

🎈Welcome Back to School!🎈



Hello Teachers!
Happy August! 

 Are you ready to head back to school? I am!  

Thinking about how many teachers will find English Language Learners (ELLs) on classroom rosters this year, I thought I would share some ideas used to establish a warm, and supportive learning environment for second language learners.    

As teachers we know that creating a safe and secure classroom environment includes such things as:

•Arrange the classroom in a way to maximize interaction with clear walkways and designated work areas
Post student work   
Display classroom rules and procedures
Model kindness, patience and respect
Smile often, laughing with our students and giving explicit positive reinforcement

  

You can ensure a sheltered and supportive classroom for your English language learners by including labels for your room and classroom objects that include words and pictures.  This helps build vocabulary and helps limited or non-speakers know where things go and what they are called.

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Back-to-School-Word-Wall-copy-cut-and-go-1873692

Don’t forget to put up your word walls!

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Back-to-School-Word-Wall-copy-cut-and-go-1873692 A vocabulary word wall is an organized group of large print words posted on a bulletin board or wall in your classroom. Word walls draw attention to the words you are teaching and are used in whole class or small group activities.

Word walls provide a systematic visual vocabulary organizer that aides children in seeing and remembering connections between words and the characteristics that help them form categories and schemas to remember how to use them.

Click here to get this great freebie!
 

 
Integrate Ells’ first language and culture into your classroom when possible.  Incorporate all students into the classroom by putting up posters, books, songs and pictures of different cultures.

Remember to develop and maintain predictable procedures, schedules and routines.  I model and practice these often during the first weeks of school and adhere to them throughout the year.  Posting a schedule, content and language objectives, rules, lunch menus and bus schedules gives a sense of security to students.  Try to always include pictures and simple wording.

Establish a sense of belonging by seating ELLs in the middle of the room toward the front facing the teacher.  Make regular eye contact.  Some teachers think they should not put second language students on the spot and don’t interact with them.  I feel this allows an ELL to slip to the edges of a classroom, never participating, speaking or learning. Offer support by asking ELLs to repeat a simple statement from another student.  That keeps the student engaged while lowering the affective filter!


    Further that sense of belonging by designing classroom jobs appropriate for ELL students.  There are many classroom jobs that a limited speaker can do such as:  Handing out papers, posting lunch numbers, etc.

   Have fun this year! 
   Happy Teaching!


Here is another great product to start out your year! 
 Check it out today!

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/50-Back-to-School-Sentence-Starters-575716https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/50-Back-to-School-Sentence-Starters-575716https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/50-Back-to-School-Sentence-Starters-575716
https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/50-Back-to-School-Sentence-Starters-575716

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/50-Back-to-School-Sentence-Starters-575716

 💕🎈🎈🎈🎈

from Fun To Teach ESL – Teaching English as a Second Language http://esleld.blogspot.com/2017/08/welcome-back-to-school.html

✅ Get to know your English Learners✅


Hello Teachers!
Here we go!  Another great year is coming our way!

Make all your students feel welcome and a member of your classroom community by employing these easy strategies before school starts!

Get to know your second language learners as school gets under way.  Try to find out the basic facts about each second language learner in your class.  Do you know whom they live with?  How many siblings or relatives live with them in their home?  How long has he/she lived in the country or was he/she born here?  If the student comes from another country, which one?  What town or city?  What language(s) is spoken at home?  What prior school experience does the student have?  Are they literate in their first language?

Click to download 2 free handy checklists of the above ideas and strategies.  Follow this easy checklist to be certain to cover all the areas you intend to. 


P.S. A thought on newcomers.  When I have newcomers (students new to my school or to the country) in my classroom I don’t forget to address a human basic need:  safety!   To make the students feel safe and secure assign a peer as the ELLs’ buddy.   Choose peer buddies who know the school and can give the newcomers a tour of the school, rooms, offices, bathrooms and classrooms.  The buddies introduce the newcomers to teachers, staff and aides who need to know that these students are limited or non-English speakers.  This is the first step in providing my students with a safe environment.


 What strategies and activities do you use to design a safe, secure learning environment for your second language learners?  Please share your ideas with us!

Have fun and happy teaching!
💕💕



from Fun To Teach ESL – Teaching English as a Second Language http://esleld.blogspot.com/2017/08/get-to-know-your-english-learners.html

👀TPT Back to School!👀

 💜Hello everyone!

August is back to school month!

It is time to get inspired and Teachers Pay Teachers is the place to find your inspiration!


https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/ESL-ELD-Songs-and-Chants-Volume-I-224849
August 1st and 2nd is the site -wide sale.  

Pop over to the Fun To Teach Store and stock up on products that will inspire you and ignite your teaching!

Check out some of our best selling products!

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Fun-To-Teach







 

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Fun-To-Teach 

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Fun-To-Teach 

Happy summer!

Happy Teaching! 

Lori



from Fun To Teach ESL – Teaching English as a Second Language http://esleld.blogspot.com/2017/07/tpt-back-to-school.html

🔨September Workshop🔨

ELD Make and Take Workshops
By Fun To Teach 

🔨ELD Toolbox Booster🔨 
Fun effective strategies and activities to fill your ELD toolbox!

Save your seat now! Fax in the registration today 
2017 – Our New Workshop!
September 29, 2017
Portland, OR 

Are you interested in adding another layer of practical knowledge to your ELD instruction? Then this workshop is for you. Join us for the ELD Toolbox Booster workshop and enhance English Language instruction with procedures, routines, strategies and activities that will develop oral language, vocabulary and fluency in English learners. Come fill your ELD toolbox with language games, activities, strategies picture cards, songs, chants, sentence frames, and “make & take” activities that you can use in your classroom the next day! 

Who should attend?
ELD and ESL teachers, K-5 classroom teachers, specialist teachers and everyone who wants to fill their ELD toolkit!

🔨ELD Toolbox Booster 🔨

Portland, Oregon
Fun effective strategies and activities to fill your ELD toolbox!


$200.00PER WORKSHOP

 Call for more info or visit our website!
Click here!

• •
fax or mail a Purchase Order or check

Happy Teaching!

Lori
from Fun To Teach ESL – Teaching English as a Second Language http://esleld.blogspot.com/2017/07/september-workshop.html

ESP Training for Student Consulting Purposes

Hello, ESPers worldwide!

I was reflecting on my ELT program development recently, and I recognized that my leadership development programs are often connected to consulting. For such consulting activities, there may be a need for ESP training. In this TESOL Blog post, I would like to focus on a few programs that are listed on my website – The Leadership Connection Project.

The Introduction to the website states:

The Leadership Connection Project website was created for the purpose of recording the various leadership development activities that I have conducted with my students in the Career Education Center and in the Department of International Communication (International Business Career major) at Kanda University of International Studies (KUIS) in Chiba, Japan.

In our profession, it is important to share accomplishments with stakeholders, so on the website I have identified the departments of my university together with the relevant programs:
KUIS Career Education Center

KUIS Intercultural Communication Department (International Business Career Major)

KUIS Self-Access Learning Center

KUIS International Affairs Division

I consider the six programs above  to be related to the development of leaders because I conceptualize leadership as involving communication to create and to achieve visions. In each of the six programs, the students communicate to create visions and to achieve those visions.

Four of the six programs include consulting activities:

  • Kevin’s Company
  • Leadership seminars
  • Global Leadership Competition in the SALC
  • Inaugural Global Challenge Program

As consultants, the students work in teams (or alone) to create visions for organizations (i.e., the clients) through the following activities:

  • interacting (through email and/or face to face) with leaders of the organizations
  • conducting research about the organizations online and onsite
  • analyzing the internal and external environments to identify strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats, etc.
  • delivering recommendations (to the leaders of the organizations) in PowerPoint presentations

When the students deliver their recommendations in PowerPoint presentations, they are creating visions.

The ESP strands of each program are connected with the students’ needs for English as a communication tool in their roles as consultants. For example, the instructor may need to help the students to do the following in English:

  • conduct research online and/or onsite (and accordingly participate in interviews, meetings, discussions, etc.)
  • write email to various stakeholders (including leaders of the organizations as well as mentors/coaches)
  • create and deliver presentations

The students’ needs to use English as a communication tool are immediate needs.

In connection with such immediate needs for communication in English, the students may need to learn specific content. The content is related to the consulting project. Consider the following examples:

  • In Kevin’s Company, the students recommend how to improve the business operations of British Hills, a resort and educational training facility in Japan.
  • In the leadership seminars and in the Global Leadership Competition in the SALC, the students provide consulting services for the KUIS SALC.
  • In the Global Challenge Program, the students needed to understand the food industry in Japan and the business operations of the retail outlets of a food company.

The teacher may not be an expert in such content but may be able to teach the students how to find what they need on their own (i.e., self-access learning). In addition, in some cases, the students may have content available in Japanese and need to learn how to communicate the Japanese content in the English language.

In summary, in the four programs that include consulting activities, the instructor is a leader of consulting teams. The members of these teams are themselves acting as leaders when they provide their recommendations (i.e., visions) to their respective clients. The need for ESP training depends on the immediate needs of the students for English communication skills in their roles as consultants.

Good luck with your ESP and leadership development activities!

All the best,
Kevin

from TESOL Blog http://blog.tesol.org/esp-training-for-student-consulting-purposes/

A bit closer!

Happy Thursday!
Here is a fun song to practice early advanced prepositions!  Sing it to the tune of Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star or as a call back.

Have fun with it!

A bit closer
A bit farther
A bit higher
A bit lower
A little to the left
A little to the right
Not quite in the middle
Within an inch…or a ????

 Happy teaching!

ESL & ELD Songs and Chants Volume I SING IT LOUD! SING IT CLEAR!  This 51-page collection of ELD and ESL songs and black lines are perfect for every classroom with second language learners. Open every lesson with a song or chant from this rich collection of ELD based lyrics and watch your students' fluency grow. Volume I includes 22 songs/ chants, lesson ideas and activities that will raise the oral academic language of your students to new heights. The songs and chants are sung to familiar popular songs or the lyrics are used in call backs or chant style tunes. These lyrics provide a compelling way to begin your ELD lesson while targeting complex English Structures. You and your students will enjoy these engaging and memorable lyrics.  Songs and Chants for: Possessive Pronouns Reflexive Pronouns Present Tense Questions Regular Past Tense Verbs Past Tense Questions Present Perfect Prepositions  Language levels included: Beginning Intermediate Advanced

This 51-page collection of ELD and ESL songs and black lines are perfect for every classroom with second language learners. Open every lesson with a song or chant from this rich collection of ELD based lyrics and watch your students’ fluency grow. Volume I includes 22 songs/ chants, lesson ideas and activities that will raise the oral academic language of your students to new heights. The songs and chants are sung to familiar popular songs or the lyrics are used in call backs or chant style tunes. These lyrics provide a compelling way to begin your ELD lesson while targeting complex English Structures. You and your students will enjoy these engaging and memorable lyrics.

Songs and Chants for:
Possessive Pronouns
Reflexive Pronouns
Present Tense Questions
Regular Past Tense Verbs
Past Tense Questions
Present Perfect
Prepositions

Language levels included:
Beginning
Intermediate
Advanced




from Fun To Teach ESL – Teaching English as a Second Language http://esleld.blogspot.com/2017/07/a-bit-closer.html